Global Crane News


Good News for Wattled Cranes in Zambia



Great news from Zambia! We just completed 29 hours of intensive aerial surveys over the Kafue Flats, and our preliminary estimate of the number of Wattled Cranes is more than 2,300 – the largest population of Wattled Cranes in the world and the highest count anywhere since the 1980s!

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Vietnam Celebrates Sarus Cranes


Symbols of long life, fidelity, and the link between earth and heaven, cranes are sacred throughout the world. Can this special connection help protect cranes and the wild places where they live, while benefiting us too? We have reason to believe so.

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The Endangered Wildlife Trust Responds to Blue Crane Mass Poisoning Allegations in South Africa



Earlier this week, media coverage of the possible poisoning of 200-1,000 Blue Cranes over a three-year period by a farmer in the Northern Cape of South Africa made headlines within the conservation community. ICF’s South Africa based partner The Endangered Wildlife Trust responded immediately to these allegations by contacting the agency responsible for the official investigation and is assisting wherever possible in the investigation.

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The Journey of Hope



In August 2014, a team of scientists from the International Crane Foundation, Mongolian Wildlife Science and Conservation Center, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, and U.S. Forest Service traveled to the Khurkh and Khuiten River Valleys of northern Mongolia to study this important breeding area for White-naped Cranes.

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Notes from the Field: Cheorwon Basin Winter Refuge for Cranes in Korea



Can you imagine seeing seven species of cranes in one morning?!? Today our ICF group visited the remarkable Cheorwon basin of South Korea near the demilitarized zone that divides the hostile Korean peninsula. Cheorwon is renowned for the large concentrations of wintering Red-crowned and White-naped Cranes that feed on waste grain in this agricultural landscape – one of the very best places to see these two endangered species.

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