Global Crane News


The Endangered Wildlife Trust Responds to Blue Crane Mass Poisoning Allegations in South Africa



Earlier this week, media coverage of the possible poisoning of 200-1,000 Blue Cranes over a three-year period by a farmer in the Northern Cape of South Africa made headlines within the conservation community. ICF’s South Africa based partner The Endangered Wildlife Trust responded immediately to these allegations by contacting the agency responsible for the official investigation and is assisting wherever possible in the investigation.

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The Journey of Hope



In August 2014, a team of scientists from the International Crane Foundation, Mongolian Wildlife Science and Conservation Center, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, and U.S. Forest Service traveled to the Khurkh and Khuiten River Valleys of northern Mongolia to study this important breeding area for White-naped Cranes.

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Notes from the Field: Cheorwon Basin Winter Refuge for Cranes in Korea



Can you imagine seeing seven species of cranes in one morning?!? Today our ICF group visited the remarkable Cheorwon basin of South Korea near the demilitarized zone that divides the hostile Korean peninsula. Cheorwon is renowned for the large concentrations of wintering Red-crowned and White-naped Cranes that feed on waste grain in this agricultural landscape – one of the very best places to see these two endangered species.

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ICF Colleague Receives Rolex Award for Grey Crowned Crane Conservation in Rwanda



A single individual can make a difference, and the International Crane Foundation and our major partner in Africa, the Endangered Wildlife Trust, congratulate wildlife conservationist and veterinarian, Olivier Nsengimana, for receiving the 2014 Rolex Award for Enterprise for his work to protect Grey Crowned Cranes in Rwanda.

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Travels with George: Australia 2014


Forty-two years have rapidly passed since I enjoyed two months on Queensland’s Atherton Tablelands with Sarus Cranes, Brolgas and a new crane I discovered, the Sarolga (a hybrid). This October, crane country looked much the same, but the town of Atherton had tripled in size, and Sarus had increased from about 150, to more than a thousand.

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